You got questions, I got answers.

My brain, picked and distributed on the web. At any moment, time or situation.

In other words...randomness.
jessehimself:

“There has been a lot of evil in the world. But to me, none as great as slavery. It’s the worst thing that has ever happened. They take you from your home. They take you from your family, your history. They make you work. They tell you when to mate. They chop off your foot if you try to run away. And I’m sorry to say this, but white people did that. And black people are still living with the remnants. For over 200 years, black people built this country and didn’t get a single dollar. And sure, it isn’t happening anymore, but we’re still living with the remnants. We don’t have the same connections, the same powerful friends, the same access to capital. I tell young African Americans that they’ll do just fine, but they’re going to have to work twice as hard. I tell them that they will need to go out of their way to search for their identity. They aren’t going to find much about their heritage in the history books. Even the constitution classifies black people as three-fifths of a man, and that was supposedly written by the most enlightened, glorified white people of that time. I tell young African Americans that they are going to have to dig hard to find out the giant contributions that Africa made to civilization, because they aren’t going to find it on the television. And I tell them that just because it’s a tough road does not excuse them from personal responsibility. I tell them that God put them on earth to build and not destroy. And I tell them that some opportunities cost money, but books are absolutely free.”
humans of New York

jessehimself:

“There has been a lot of evil in the world. But to me, none as great as slavery. It’s the worst thing that has ever happened. They take you from your home. They take you from your family, your history. They make you work. They tell you when to mate. They chop off your foot if you try to run away. And I’m sorry to say this, but white people did that. And black people are still living with the remnants. For over 200 years, black people built this country and didn’t get a single dollar. And sure, it isn’t happening anymore, but we’re still living with the remnants. We don’t have the same connections, the same powerful friends, the same access to capital. I tell young African Americans that they’ll do just fine, but they’re going to have to work twice as hard. I tell them that they will need to go out of their way to search for their identity. They aren’t going to find much about their heritage in the history books. Even the constitution classifies black people as three-fifths of a man, and that was supposedly written by the most enlightened, glorified white people of that time. I tell young African Americans that they are going to have to dig hard to find out the giant contributions that Africa made to civilization, because they aren’t going to find it on the television. And I tell them that just because it’s a tough road does not excuse them from personal responsibility. I tell them that God put them on earth to build and not destroy. And I tell them that some opportunities cost money, but books are absolutely free.”

humans of New York

1 day ago
294 notes
I. Can. Not. Wait.

I. Can. Not. Wait.

(Source: linxspiration, via visualcocaine)

1 day ago
501 notes
defjamblr:

On this day September 29, 1998 Jay-Z released his third album “Vol. 2…Hard Knock Life” on Roc-A-Fella/Def Jam Recordings. #DefJam30

defjamblr:

On this day September 29, 1998 Jay-Z released his third album “Vol. 2…Hard Knock Life” on Roc-A-Fella/Def Jam Recordings. #DefJam30

2 days ago
145 notes

itstonybetch:

How Christina Aguilera singes lullabies to her children

(Source: imnotjailbait, via naturallyunexpected)

2 days ago
259,005 notes
MBTI In Stressful Situations

sixteentypes:

INFP: diligently ignores problem until it’s too big to manage
ESTJ: ‘exactly as i say, or else’
ISFP: lists and lists and lists and lists…
ESFJ: vocalizes everything they’re doing
ISFJ: move bitch, get out the way
ENTP: too interested by the options to do…

Damn. INFP here.

1 day ago
8,193 notes

arienreign:

i bought this skull for a cosplay and

(via naturallyunexpected)

1 day ago
193,307 notes
Bye Bye Bywater (Discover New Orleans PARODY) - YouTube

We love the folks who come to stay. Just appreciate and add to the value. Don’t take away, yo.

2 days ago
1 note
chocolattabrides:

AN AFRICAN PRINCESS WHO STOOD UNAFRAID AMONG NAZISHer autobiography is a one-of-a-kind perspective of an educated, empowered, world-traveling daughter of a royal family, which no one wanted to publish until now. Between 1939 and 1946, Fatima Massaquoi penned one of the earliest known autobiographies by an African woman. But few outside of Liberian circles were aware of it until this week, when Palgrave McMillian published The Autobiography of an African Princess, edited by two historians and the author’s daughter.In her final chapter, Massaquoi, writing in 1946, reflects on her experience in the United States:“This vast country has everything good and evil. It has sympathetic men and women, who can be as selfish as they can be kind. There is, in the words of Goethe, ‘much light,’ but also ‘much shade.’ But in spite of all this, freedom here is incomparable; no wonder then that the Negro can be lynched, and yet a Negro can stand and sing ‘My Country ’Tis of Thee.’ There is very much to learn from the United States, if we can scratch the varnish off the surface and take the woodwork that is solid and not rotten.”SOURCE: http://wapo.st/1cb8049THE BOOK: http://amzn.to/1aLGXvp
 

chocolattabrides:

AN AFRICAN PRINCESS WHO STOOD UNAFRAID AMONG NAZIS

Her autobiography is a one-of-a-kind perspective of an educated, empowered, world-traveling daughter of a royal family, which no one wanted to publish until now. Between 1939 and 1946, Fatima Massaquoi penned one of the earliest known autobiographies by an African woman. But few outside of Liberian circles were aware of it until this week, when Palgrave McMillian published The Autobiography of an African Princess, edited by two historians and the author’s daughter.

In her final chapter, Massaquoi, writing in 1946, reflects on her experience in the United States:

“This vast country has everything good and evil. It has sympathetic men and women, who can be as selfish as they can be kind. There is, in the words of Goethe, ‘much light,’ but also ‘much shade.’ But in spite of all this, freedom here is incomparable; no wonder then that the Negro can be lynched, and yet a Negro can stand and sing ‘My Country ’Tis of Thee.’ There is very much to learn from the United States, if we can scratch the varnish off the surface and take the woodwork that is solid and not rotten.”

SOURCE: http://wapo.st/1cb8049
THE BOOK: http://amzn.to/1aLGXvp

 

(via jessehimself)

3 days ago
1,580 notes